Explorer: Hong Kong

Lap of luxury

Despite challengers to the regional retail crown, Hong Kong is still the place where new retail concepts are found first. Brands trial their latest ideas here as they are often readily accepted and quickly proven or not.

One such concept is the new Ralph’s Coffee, an upmarket cafe from the Ralph Lauren brand stable. The brand has already made headway in New York, Chicago, London and Paris, and in April opened its first Asia outlet in the hugely popular Ocean Terminal Mall. Richly decorated in the brands hero green livery, it has a Brooklyn style ‘look and feel’ with smart, signature packaging for take home coffee and associated coffee brew wares.

Also in The Ocean Terminal is a new branch of the BEYORG Organic spa – also with stores in the upscale Landmark and Pacific Place. Beauty retailers abound in Hong Kong, and it’s a huge and booming business. But to make money brands must have a superior concept and elevated brand delivery for success: A clearly differentiated brand concept, high innovation, superior service and simply the most beautiful and effective products. This brand ticks all the boxes.

Other points of newness include the latest Cos flagship store (bigger but different?), in Central and the eye-catching but bizarre Prada Pop Up Store in the Pacific Mall. This homage to retro train travel sees Prada with its own massive replica train carriage of the Silver Line. This doubles as a place to its luxury bags, luggage and leather goods.

Visiting a ‘quality’ mall near you, the Prada Silver Line Pop Up Shop is currently working its way around upscale shopping malls around the world – last stop before Hong Kong was Istanbul. Europe and the USA are scheduled.

Retail and retailers are always evolving, and the pace in Hong Kong is only getting faster. Without continual investment instore – especially in bold cutting edge retail environments (no half measures work here)… brands can quickly date and look tired.

In my opinion, this point should not be lost on Hong Kong mainstay, Lane Crawford. This eponymous chain of luxury department stores is starting to look weary. It’s main stores in Times Square, The Ocean Terminal, Pacific Place and IFC mall are rapidly slipping behind. Lane Crawford has long been a byword in brand innovation and luxury through the products it stocks. Brands and consumers want to be seen here. But it has been some time since any major refurbishment work was carried out in its stores, and whilst VM and standards are still pretty much on point, shoppers have not experienced anything new for some years.

With competition so fierce, there can be no room for complacency. And while its stores may still look ‘new’ to tourist and one time shoppers, Hong Kongers with large disposable income and lavish lifestyles will no doubt be eager to see new, more and better from their ‘go to’ department store brand.

Like the Prada Silver Line train, Retail doesn’t stop in one place for long. While it is evident that the Chinese tourists are back in Hong Kong – doubtlessly a relief to luxury International brands that, for many years, were boosted by the emerging Chinese middle-class economy – and eager to ‘jump aboard’, with them comes heightened expectations for new ideas, better concepts, leading standards of store presentation and exceptional customer service. Retailers in the region may once again be set to see their fortunes grow; but success is likely to be reserved only for those that have to continued to invest in ‘better’.

News The trouble with M&S…

Marks & Spencer has suffered a big fall in annual profits and is to close 100 stores. Like many in the industry, the news came as no surprise to me. Put simply, M&S has been off the mark and lacked its spark for several years – spending too long dealing with legacy problems, instead of looking to the future.

So where does a retailer of this size and scale go from here, in its bid to deliver effective retail transformation?

Weight of opinion.

It seems everyone has an opinion, yet some topics are over-discussed. M&S is one of them. Indeed, there was an entire TV episode (aired last night on Channel 5, Thursday 24 May 9pm) entitled ‘The Trouble With M&S’, dedicated to exploring the retailer’s woes.

M&S CEO Steve Rowe admitted this week that the business has been too “inward looking”. But listening to the hordes of external voices will, ultimately, add little value either. Like a football stadium filled with thousands of ‘managers’ on a matchday who could all do a better job. What M&S needs now are trusted, experienced hands and (finally) real action to transform retail performance – and quickly.

Back in 2016, I urged M&S to refocus its proposition, build on its strengths and offer much a better shopping experience for its customers. For the greater good of British retail, I felt compelled to speak out. That was when Rowe first announced plans to conduct a review into its store estate. Since then, change has been slow arriving – too slow. Maybe not to those working internally, but certainly in the eyes of those who matter most: M&S customers. Two years in modern retail is an eternity.

Change needed, fast.

When so much seemingly needs to change, the challenge ahead can appear both complex and convoluted. Typically, it’s not:

1. Define a clear and effective Recovery Plan
2. Focus on what you want to be known for
3. Provide unified, aligned and expert instore delivery
4. Be clear on how you want customers to shop your stores
5. Support transformation with stability, conviction and clear communication.

Getting the basics right really can and does make a difference. And best of all, many of the foundational pillars of effective transformation available to M&S (and others like it) are, in fact, relatively low cost or no cost ‘quick wins’.

These can deliver visible change in the eyes of customers, employees and shareholders which belie the lack of agility that larger retailers often struggle with – reinvigorating stores in the here and now, and buying crucial time while larger-scale soul searching and restructuring takes place, to secure the longer-term future of the business.

M&S has struggled to excite and entice customers within its stores for some time now. Thankfully, for what it was worth (in terms of goodwill, rather than money in the till), people continually willed it to revive its fortunes. But customers are fast losing faith and patience: just how many people really do believe in M&S anymore?

Time is short. This moment calls for decisive action, and the senior team within M&S will be all too aware of what is at stake.

Wise admission?

In this months Retail Focus column, I discuss how more retailers are embracing the new ‘experience economy’. Should we be charging shoppers to enter stores?

With the nation gripped with Royal Wedding fever, it’s hard to avoid the headlines and the big debate – who should foot the bill? While taxpayers aren’t funding the wedding itself, it’s likely they will be paying for security, road closures and policing, all of which can come at a high cost. Perhaps Harry and Meghan could take a leaf out of one resourceful couple’s book, who – when realising they couldn’t afford a big wedding – decided to charge their guests a £150 admission fee; putting them up in an all-inclusive resort to sweeten the deal. Controversial… perhaps. Or just smart thinking?

After all, paying for experiences is hardly new. We visit sporting events, music festivals, the theatre, historical landmarks, and know that there will be an entrance fee. And as more and more retailers are moving towards embracing the new ‘experience economy’, could paying to visit a retailer soon become the new norm?

It’s certainly become something of an emerging trend. Take mobile network Three who is launching its ‘All you can pug’ brunch event this month, where guests pay £5 to gather with their furry friends to enjoy a tasty meal together and 75-minute experience. Or the ‘Gucci Garden’, a grand example of experiential retail where shoppers were charged €8 to enter its multi-level galleria. Then there is small UK coffee chain Zieferblat who asks guests to pay per minute to enjoy their facilities – but don’t charge them for the coffee itself. And let’s not forget one of the original ‘paid-for’ outlets – Costco customers have long been paying an admission fee, although they hardly receive a retail experience in return.

In some cases, retailers take the opportunity to sell space to third-party brands, a sensible way to recoup some of their commercial costs (as long as they choose wisely). But increasingly, retailers are seeing their premises not just as selling spaces but as ‘doing’ spaces, where giving a high-cost experience for free makes little commercial sense.

Is there an opportunity for retailers to charge for experiential retail, and will shoppers be willing to fork out? Absolutely. But not for things which should already be integral to the brand experience instore.

There is, however, a fine line between added-value experiences and minimum expected standards. I have certain expectations when I visit a store or an outlet. They’re not what I’d consider to be big or demanding, simply what smart and savvy brands should be delivering without a second thought.

Shoppers are perhaps a little more discerning than retailers given them credit for. Most are not time poor, but are time precious – so they are selective about how they spend time as well as money. There are certain areas of the store they want to hurry through – and conversely, certain areas they’re more inclined to linger. In the same way, there are certain experiences they expect as a given, and others which they see as ‘high value’ and are more inclined to pay for.

It should go without saying, but a shopping experience that’s logical, easy and enjoyable should come as standard. In the pursuit of delivering ever-more imaginative and engaging retail experiences, the fundamental basics of good retailing should never be allowed to slip. They need to be well maintained, all day, every day, offering a consistent experience to shoppers at every visit. These are the not-unreasonable expectations of what any good retailer should unequivocally be offering.

Perhaps if more retailers and store teams approached maintaining daily retail standards as if their customers had paid to enter their store, we would immediately see a visible difference. Why is so much attention given to the small details of daily maintaining standards within the hotel industry? Because customers are paying to be there, and expectations are therefore higher, on both sides.

Retailers could ask themselves the question: ‘If we were charging customers, would they buy it?’ Essentially they should be creating an experience that is worth an admission fee, even if one is never charged. My bugbear is that more retailers should be raising standards as if they had a monetary value attached. Which in fact, they do – getting these essentials right helps to foster brand loyalty, makes for an enjoyable shopping experience and creates a warm, welcoming retail environment. And what price all of that?

Really, there are no excuses here to not be getting it right – with numerous examples of best practice and support out there from specialists to help retailers deliver ‘root and branch’ transformation of their retail experience.

Retailers need to get realistic. Before they start heading down the admission fee route, they need to look at what they’re currently offering and asking themselves if this is simply a decent shopping experience. Until more retailers get this right, charging more for elevated experiences will be a very long way off for many.

Explorer: Venice

High water mark

In many ways, Venice could easily be used as a metaphor for the current state of retail. Like the tide that laps against its palazzos, the city is ever-changing, over the years it has been forced to use its initiative, it works hard to maintain a distinct identity, and it continues to rely on innovative ideas in order to survive. This is a place where water and ingenuity is plentiful.

Venice has long been a favourite destination for tourists. The maritime city is idyllic, with its own romantic charm. Views here have changed little since the original Canaletto architectural paintings of the 1700’s. Now, only time and the ravages of weathering have altered the scenic splendour – the once pristine rendered and stucco painted facades, revealing more of their red brick inner core closer to the waterline. The rich wooden and stonework features now with a patina of dirt, grime and centuries-old rot.

But what is the city like as a destination for retail?

With no cars, taxis, trucks or motorised vehicles of any kind, the city arguably offers the perfect environment for shoppers to enjoy their retail travels around the stores that Venice has to offer: calm, peaceful, tranquil and sedate – in fact, almost completely noise free.

Here, the corporate world of architecture is not celebrated. Those who adore glass towers and views from 50 floors up will be disappointed. You’ll find no retail street signs, neon, LED or digital screens shouting for your attention either. It’s transformative, restorative and harks back to a quieter life and times. And it’s not needed. The scenery speaks for itself.

The biggest space for retail is reserved for the department store Fondaco Dei Tedeschi, one of the most famous buildings in Venice located at the foot of the Rialto Bridge on the Grand Canal. Like most Venetian building with a grand waterfront, signage is not allowed. Shoppers chance upon and discover this place via one of the narrow cobbled streets that make up the streetscape.

Inside, the building pulls plenty of surprises. Most Venice buildings are small, low ceilinged affairs with beautiful historic interiors. This store opens up into a vast central atrium, like a roman amphitheatre. Stone built with massive blocks, its is cut through on every floor with half moon windows, like stone made festoon blinds opening views to every floor. It’s a story of complete luxury. The finest clothing, accessories and beauty brands are arranged in beautifully crafted mini boutiques around the central atrium. In fact the store is notable for the space it does not use for merchandise. If ever the term less is more applied, it is here.

Perhaps the most refreshing reason for visiting the city is to escape the homogenised streets and malls that greet your every turn in most European cities. Make no mistake: chain store retail is here, but it is very limited in the number of outlets and brands. It really does make a change not to see the usual suspects of brands, names or things we see everywhere, and all the time.

Luxury retail, as you would expect, dominates. But few of these retailers offer little in the way of newness or inspiration for those hoping to spark their imaginations. For that, you have to venture into one of the many high quality independent family retailers that can be found across the city, producing beautiful artisan Italian goods. From handcrafted leather and shoes to deliciously tempting confectionery.

Whether you have a sweet tooth or not, Venice itself is a real treat – in the most subtle of ways. It’s humble, unassuming and grand (by default) at the same time. But above all, it feels like slow and personal. A place that’s clearly content to go as its own (gondola-like) pace and maintain its traditional values and conservative lifestyle, while the rest of the world speeds on by. A place to relax, contemplate and take in the sights while recharging your soul, and possibly buy something unique and memorable too.

(Spring) Clean Conscience?

I discuss how retailers are simply struggling to survive under enormous pressures to find ways of delivering growth in a difficult climate in this months Retail Focus column.

The government has pushed ahead with its new sugar tax in its bid to tackle obesity and help reduce the nation’s waistlines – though after consuming copious amounts of chocolate over Easter, the sugar content of soft drinks may hardly register.

While the new levy will hit those with a sweet tooth, it is consumers with a conscience that have, traditionally, paid the price. Want to support brands that are socially responsible? You’ll pay more. Buy organic – pay more. Make ‘green’ choices in the products you purchase – pay more. ‘We can’t afford to shop at any store that has a “philosophy”!’ Although these words may come from the iconic, albeit fictional, cartoon matriarch Marge Simpson, when discussing where to go shopping, they capture the sentiment perfectly.

But the focus is shifting, away from the cost to consumers of being ethical and towards the price that retailers are likely to pay for a failure to demonstrate a strong moral stance. At the same time, the question of what it truly means to be ‘ethical’, and how retailers should respond to this increasing scrutiny, is an interesting one. Recent full-page ads depicting a (seemingly) contrite Mark Zuckerberg pleading for forgiveness over data harvesting claims show how even the mightiest can fall when faced with the wrath of a duped public.

Of course, the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility has been around for a while. But where before the focus was primarily on environmental credentials and ethical supply chains, it has now taken on a more holistic mantle. Consumers are no longer simply demanding to know exactly how and where products are manufactured. Like retailing itself, it has become more about taking a 360 degree approach – encompassing diversity, morality, environment, provenance, workers rights, and declaring specific ambitions to make a change for the good.

Many large corporations could take inspiration from smaller retailers, who have led the ‘quiet revolution’ of transparency and conscience, pushing it not as part of their brand but as intrinsically in their DNA. Organisations like Hiut Denim, a fashionista-favourite high-end jeans manufacturer that harnesses local skills and craftsmanship in its hometown of Cardigan in Wales. Previously home to a factory that produced jeans for Marks & Spencer, the town boasted workers with artisan skills and Hiut Denim’s founder David Hieatt focuses on this heritage as a key part of his brand.

One example that is particular pertinent, as I prepare to head to Montreal later this month, is Canadian fast-food chain Tim Hortons. This brand has moved away from the ‘quick and dirty’ side of fast food, instead focusing on boosting its community credentials, acting as a friendly neighbour rather than a faceless corporation. But sadly, even such bighearted brands can have a dark side, and recent news one of its franchises is scrapping its paid breaks for workers has put a question mark over its true ethical commitments. Can a company that (somewhat ironically) relies heavily on coffee-break sales scrap this perk for its own employees? After all, if other employers followed suit, Tim Hortons may find its coffee machines grinding slowly to a halt.

In a similar fashion, consumers are now quick to hit retailers the ‘hypocrisy’ tag. Launching an instore recycling initiative to let shoppers drop off unwanted items at their nearest store is laudable. But miss the mark on issues like diversity and consumers will soon forget such admirable gestures. The extent to which H&M was vilified for its ‘monkey’ hoodie gaff at the start of the year is proof enough of that fact. Topman has also endured its own Twitter storm for its red ’96’ hoodie, designed to celebrate a Bob Marley song but seen as distasteful in its unwitting reference to the Hillsborough disaster.

In today’s world, calculated tactics, however good their intentions, and honest mistakes are seen as equal affronts by eagle-eyed consumers – Millennials in particular – raised on a diet of social media outrage. Whatever you stand for; if you don’t do it, mean it and live it, the message from consumers is clear – we are simply not prepared to buy into that.

One final word on ethical behaviour: Taxation. As many, including myself, have been discussing in the media and online discussions recently, the practice from some etailers of making large revenues but declaring widening losses due to ‘building the brand’ is becoming increasingly prevalent. At what point do online retailers have to show a profit… if ever? Surely it’s only a matter of time before this is put under the same kind of spotlight as Corporation Tax avoidance?

There are unspoken rules of conduct in many aspects of everyday life: keeping to the right of the escalator on the Tube or tipping for good service in a restaurant. For me, any brand that innovates and serves their shoppers well should enjoy the commercial rewards. But they should also declare their profits to the exchequer like all good citizens are expected to do.

It’s little wonder then that many of world’s biggest brands today invest huge sums on elaborate PR efforts to promote greater transparency to consumers. Although clearly, some have more work to do than others.

We all know retailers are under enormous pressures to find ways of delivering growth in a difficult climate. In some cases, they are simply struggling to survive. But this can categorically not be done at the expense of ethical behaviour.

Yes, everyone accepts the fact that balancing divergent and competing demands is increasingly difficult. But for all the effort and energy retailers may putting into delivering transformation and turning around fortunes at the minute, the harsh truth is this: one wrong step and all your good work can be undone, in an instant.

Can one person change fortunes?

This months column looks at why decisive leadership is crucial to retail transformation success. 

Strong leadership is crucial in all walks of life. Leading through continued success takes one type of person. Pulling people up, making them believe and giving them hope and motivation during bleak times takes quite another.

While I often like to focus on the importance of teamwork in retail, it would be almost negligent to overlook the importance of that one person at the top – with a clear vision, focus and determination – in delivering success.

One such example is departing Burberry boss Christopher Bailey. This visionary leader delivered his last London Fashion Week show recently, and deserves to be applauded for his revolutionary work with the brand. Since joining as CEO in 2014, he has turned Burberry’s fortunes around, making it Britain’s biggest luxury brand.

Using several innovations, he has arguably taken the brand to new levels – it was the first to 3D live-stream catwalks and advertise on Snapchat, plus it famously combined men’s and women’s fashion into one show.

The brand’s new chief creative officer is Riccardo Tisci. He may have been somewhat of a surprise appointment to those anticipating a British designer to be named, but Tisci, already credited with turning around the fortunes of Givenchy, could prove, once again, to be another inspiring appointment by Burberry.

Being the prominent figurehead of a brand is not without its challenges though. Once a leading light in every respect, Sir Philip Green’s reputation since the downfall of BHS – and the accompanying pensions debate – has been somewhat tarnished. Rumblings of a sale of his Arcadia empire to the Chinese abound – as his ageing brands Dorothy Perkins, Wallis and Evans are overshadowed by more contemporary players such as boohoo and Missguided. With Green denying the deal, we can only speculate upon the future of this battle-bruised leader.

Green is perhaps a good example of not allowing complacency to sneak in. It is a reality that sometimes established retailers can become too big, too lumbering, too bureaucratic. And when this happens, an injection of fresh blood is often the only way to reverse the fading fortunes.

One brand that is currently seeking a revival of fortunes under new leadership is fashion giant New Look. The retailer is one of several fast-fashion brands which has had to battle a barrage of negative media headlines in recent months. It’s at times like these that strong, confident and bullish leadership is called for – the ability to deliver quick, decisive change in the face of adversity really can be the difference.

Perhaps here I can reference another classic film, The Godfather – in which Michael Corleone tells Tom Hagen, ‘You’re not a wartime consigliere, Tom.’ Solid, dependable, loyal… yet what the family needed at that given time was someone with fire in their belly and passion in their blood. And in a similar vein, New Look recently brought back its own ‘wartime consigliere’ in the shape of Alistair McGeorge, to lead a turnaround of the retailer’s fortunes. Since his return, he has spoken with fiercely assured rhetoric about this being a brand that knows what has to be done, and intent on making it happen.

Transforming a retail giant’s fortunes in today’s tough economic climate, let alone in the face of endless doom-mongers, takes steely resolve, unswerving determination and complete, unshakeable faith in your decision making.

For these strong leaders, there is no room for sitting on the fence, prevaricating or muddled visions. Sharen Jester Turney, during her time as president and CEO at Victoria’s Secret, turned the brand into a global powerhouse, with strong, solid sales and an international reputation. Sir Stuart Rose performed similar feats, resuscitating Marks & Spencer during his time at the helm there.

During 2018, there could be any number of retailers that may have to look to their respective leaders to deliver similar decisive action, clear thinking and dynamic, dogged determination. H&M has warned of a difficult 2018 and will be looking to Karl-Johan Persson to steer it through. Debenhams is pinning its hopes on Sergio Bucher to boost its straggling sales. And after a disappointing Christmas for House of Fraser, all eyes will surely be on how Alex Williamson plans to lead the retailer out of its slump.

It’s true that success is delivered through strong retail teams. But this success can only be driven from the top. The broad shoulders of a business leader are designed to carry a business, a brand, as they strive mercilessly, endlessly, for better. This is no time for mere fighting talk. It’s time for dynamic, inspiring leadership that packs a punch from all angles.

Leave tech at the door

In the latest Monocle Magazine – April 2018 edition, I was asked by Matt Alagaih what my thoughts were on the recent and upcoming tech craze.

For many, shiny tech seems to offer salvation. So it was at the National Retail Federation’s Big Show in New York this January: whether augmented-reality mirrors or QR code scanners, gadgets and gizmos promised more enticing shopping spaces. Karl McKeever, founder and managing director of retail consultancy Visual Thinking, is not so taken with the tech. “Too often the starting point is not a requirement to solve a clearly defined shopper need but the selfish want of retailers to be seen as being on-trend and staying in step with competitors.”

The main thing technology affords is convenience but e-commerce players already have that in spades. Offline players have to compete on different metrics: beautiful interiors (not blighted by AR mirrors), enjoyable live events and ever-changing product ranges and layouts.

By all means offer free home delivery once your customers have tried clothes on but don’t let it define your space. As McKeever puts it, opt for “emotional intelligence rather than the headline-hogging artificial kind”.

Men: an endangered retail species?

In this months Retail Focus column, I discuss if men are becoming an endangered retail species. Why is directly serving the needs fo men such a delicate issue? 

Masculinity in crisis. Toxic masculinity. Increasingly, the rhetoric surrounding men is shifting, and none too subtly. The all-powerful, alpha male subtext is no longer dominant. Instead, commentators everywhere – both male and female, across the whole media spectrum – are changing the focus, asking new questions and demanding different, and better answers.

This new tone is spanning politics, TV, Hollywood and journalism. In the US, Trump, Allen, Weinstein and Spacey are continuing to leave a lasting – and negative – legacy. Closer to home, equal pay rows at the BBC and the fall-out from the President’s Club headlines have turned established concepts on their head. While some men have been rightly tamed and shamed, the wider male population may be forgiven for feeling vulnerable and scared to comment or speak out for fear of being shot down.

The truth is that male shoppers are poorly served by most high street retailers.

Masculinity is truly under an uncomfortable spotlight. And the reality is, this is no different in retail. While the march to entice the female pound continues apace, the truth is that male shoppers are poorly served by most high street retailers. Many ‘traditional’ men’s stores are becoming more female focused, with brands such as Halfords, B&Q and Richer Sounds increasingly seeking to attract more female shoppers. Meanwhile, men must be content with the rather tired concession made by womenswear retailers of a comfy seat outside the changing rooms.

Are men being (poorly) served?

Today, men’s clothing is frequently an apparent afterthought, a ‘tag on’ to womenswear in brands such as River Island and H&M, with no retail experience that specifically caters for their needs. As a result, men literally have nowhere to go. That is, unless they want highly formal wear, jeans, dedicated sportswear – or to resign themselves to shopping at M&S, George, Tu and F&F.

Across the pond, it’s much the same story, although there are a few more specific retailers for men, such as Men’s Warehouse and Johnstone & Murphy.

So why are men being so fundamentally neglected? Especially given – in an ironic truth of unequal pay – that men often have higher levels of disposable income. There is money to be made. Why don’t retailers want to make it? In the current environment, retailers are struggling to increase sales and profit, so tapping into a lucrative market like this would make perfect strategic sense.

Is it a case of equality gone too far in the other direction, ‘political correctness gone mad’ and the need to avoid discrimination accusations?

Should retailers and men be ashamed of wanting or offering this type of experience? Why not offer ‘hangout’ spaces where men can hang out in tribes and do ‘men’s stuff’ to win the male pound? Exclusive, private and masculine with no women allowed. Or more realistically, should there be a balanced middle ground? One that is glaringly absent at the moment.

Men on a mission

There’s a whole industry out there devoted to the ‘metropolitan’ man, with designer stores and fancy trappings, swanky new floors in Harrods and Harvey Nichols catering for the savvy, moisturised and bronzed guys. Beard salons, barbers, whisky bars, craft breweries and private members’ clubs are all rife – but their appeal is undeniably limited.

Online retailers follow a similar path. For a fat monthly fee, the enlightened online man can enjoy styling, grooming, butler and concierge services. Here, like a remote dating app or your Graze Box, you tap in your preferences and a neatly packed ‘new you’ will be sent out for you to slip into in the comfort of your home.

But what is there for the average, middle-aged man/dad? For those looking for a new jacket or some different shoes, these offerings are nothing short of overkill. Desperate men are scouring the high streets to find something they can relate to, away from the dizzying world of the androgynous millennial branding. It’s an era of discontent for these male shoppers who retailers are seemingly happy to ignore.

When will these men stand up and say: ‘Why aren’t we being served?’ Personally, I think sooner rather than later.

Only the most foolhardy retailer will ignore the value of the stalwart and steady male pound.

A few years ago, Moss Bros introduced a men-only mainstream lifestyle chain called Code. Modelled on the ‘next for men’ concept which was often in standalone stores, it struck a more ‘men’s only’ environment for shoppers. Would this business have fared better in this more fashion conscious and fashion confident time for men? For me, there is undoubtedly money to be made for retailers and brands that can get the right mix, and surely it won’t be long before savvy retailers really wake up to this. The ever-insightful John Lewis has already introduced personal shoppers for men into eight more of its stores after an initial trial proved popular. Experience, service and product – it’s not such a difficult concept. And Next has recently announced plans to integrate a car showroom and barber’s shop inside its Manchester Arndale store – a bold and intriguing step for a brand not renowned for its audacity.

The world of the all-powerful male is well and truly over. We’re welcoming in a new era of equality, and masculinity in crisis would perhaps be better phrased as masculinity in flux. Being reimagined and rebooted.

But only the most foolhardy retailer will ignore the value of the stalwart and steady male pound. What do men want? Perhaps more tellingly, what don’t they want? It’s time for retailers to create their own rhetoric, stepping out of the shadows of fear and becoming a beacon for other industries to emulate. One of integrity and equality… for all.

The Retail Exchange

NRF Big Show Special

Every year, the retail industry descends upon Manhattan for the NRF Big Show trade fair. This January was the biggest in the fair’s 107-year history, with over 30,000 attendees. The big technology players were all there, smaller independents jostling for space alongside them, displaying their pre-eminence and innovations.

Taking place in the current tough retail climate, I was able to spare time to report on the key themes that are set to dominate the retail agenda in the year ahead.

NRF Big Show Special